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Introduction of a blue card in football to be delayed after backlash

The potential introduction of a blue card in football has received a red card.

According to the Telegraph, the plans face stern opposition from within the game.

There were plans for an announcement today regarding the first new card since the 1970s, intended for sin-bin trials in the professional game.

However, a fiery backlash from fans, pundits and stakeholders has put that announcement on hold.

FIFA was initially on board but has issued a statement confirming that top-tier competitions wouldn’t be included in the initial trials.

They further clarified that the blue card itself would be discussed at the International Football Association Board (IFAB) meeting next month.

This casts doubt on the planned Friday announcement and suggests potential revisions to the trial protocols.

Intriguingly, FIFA’s statement highlights a possible power struggle within the law-making bodies about who truly controls rule changes – IFAB or FIFA?


Newcastle United manager Eddie Howe became the first Premier League boss to criticise the blue card publicly.

Howe labelled it confusing and unnecessary. He believes the proper application of existing yellow cards is sufficient.

He joins former players Chris Sutton and Jamie O’Hara in voicing their disapproval.

With opposition mounting and delays set in place, the future of the blue card in football appears increasingly uncertain.

Referees already navigate a delicate dance between red cards, yellow cards and the Video Assistant Referee (VAR).

Introducing a blue card, with its yet-to-be-defined purpose, risks further muddying the waters and potentially slowing down the game’s flow.

The existing tools are sufficient when used effectively. Proper utilisation of yellow cards and VAR can achieve most disciplinary goals.

Adding another card, with its unclear function and potential for misinterpretation, could create more confusion for players and officials, impacting the overall fairness and flow of the game.

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